Ayurveda - Herbal Medicine - Nutrition - Self Care - Yogic Healing - Meditation

Both Ayurveda and modern medicine agree that type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) is a multifaceted disease that  affects many organs, tissues, and channels of the body including the cardiovascular, urinary, nervous and immune systems. In Sanskrit, diabetes is called prameha, or frequent urination, because this is one of many symptoms that can be observed by those with this condition. Historically, type 2 DM was considered to be mainly adult on-set, however,  according to the CDC, we are currently seeing increased risk of type 2 DM among young children and teenagers. I will try not to shroud this topic in complex Ayurvedic or medical language, but rather use simple terms and core concepts to convey the practical approaches that can be taken by those wanting to manage or reverse this condition. 

Some Basic Ayurvedic Concepts

In Ayurveda, there are three bodily humors (doshas) that maintain the normal function of the body and mind and, when disturbed, contribute to the disease process. These three doshas are known as vata (energy of movement), pitta (energy of transformation), and kapha (energy of structure, lubrication and fluidity). Kapha imbalance can be a primary factor in the development of type 2 DM when left unmanaged. 

Kapha Imbalance and Diabetes 

Let’s first get a basic understanding of kapha dosha before venturing into how kapha contributes to diabetes and other related complications.} Kapha is made up primarily of the earth and water element and is the structural and lubricating energy of the body. Kapha has

Ayurveda - Herbal Medicine - Nutrition - Self Care - Yogic Healing - Meditation

An Ayurvedic Perspective on GERD (Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease) 

GERD occurs when digestive juices moves upward from the stomach into the esophagus causing acid reflux,An Ayurvedic Perspective on GERD (Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease) Ayurveda Medicine which over time can damage the lower esophageal lining and an increase the risk of precancerous Barrett’s esophagus. The causes of GERD can vary from diet and lifestyle factors to obesity, pregnancy, hiatal hernia and the relaxing of the lower esophageal sphincter. Factors such as smoking tobacco, eating too late at night and certain common trigger foods such as coffee, tea, alcohol, chocolate, spicy foods and tomatoes can also play a role in the worsening of symptoms.

 

Common Symptoms of GERD

  • Acid reflux
  • Heart burn
  • Esophageal spasms
  • Chest pain (retrosternal)
  • Regurgitation of food
  • Difficulty swallowing
  • Asthma
  • Chronic cough

An Ayurvedic Perspective on Digestion

To understand GERD and other related digestive disorders, lets first explore the Ayurvedic concept of Agni, the power of digestion. Agni is present within saliva, stomach acids, bile, and enzymes of the pancreatic and small intestine. When Agni is strong it supports robust appetite, optimal digestion, energy, satisfaction and overall vitality. Below is a list of various classifications of digestion according the classical Ayurvedic text on pathology and etiology- Madhava Nidana.

4 Clinical Varieties of the Digestive Fire

  1. Manda Agni occurs when the slow and sluggish nature of kapha dosha impair the digestive fire. This results in symptoms such as low appetite, slow digestion, heaviness in the stomach, food stagnation, acid reflux, sluggish bowels (not dry) and phlegmatic disorders.
  2. Tikshna Agni